Category Archives: Filmmaking

Video

Fire, Flashbangs, Filmmaking: Inauguration 2017

Fellow filmmaker and friend Georg Koszulinski invited me to DC to help him shoot a documentary focusing on the  inauguration of Donald Trump. There were massive protests scheduled on inauguration day and the day following; they would include a coalition of the willing that would make George W. Bush jealous. We ran amok with DSLR cameras trying to capture the feeling of the space and the feeling of the people (protesters and Trump supporters alike). We wanted to find a way to make sense of the madness during this shocking plot twist in American history, as a reality TV star (which already sounds like I’m making this shit up) was sworn in as President of the United States of America. Continue reading

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Fun Film Fact #1: You speak Swedish in the edit

I’m working two different film production jobs and spend quite a bit of time editing various programs.  I once remarked to someone that whenever you’re rewinding footage, everyone sounds like they’re speaking Swedish – and then I watched the delightful 80’s spoof film Top Secret! and one scene in particular had me cracking up… Continue reading

Batman goes mental in amazing fan video, The Batman Complex

When you come across fan-made videos, whether they are trailers to a film they’d love to see or short film musings on an aspect of a beloved character, they’re at best entertaining.  The fan-trailer for The Batman Complex however, goes beyond casual amusement and straight into, “Why haven’t they already made this?!” Continue reading

Special Effects you won’t believe were done for real

Here at The Filmsmith we have a great love for all the hours that go into practical special effects, those pieces of wizardry that aren’t created by computer animators.  These guys have to battle the restrictions of the real world (time, space, gravity) in order to do their job well, because when they do, you feel the term movie magic.  So here are some of the highlights from Cracked’s, “8 Special Effects You Won’t Believe Aren’t CGI.” Continue reading

X-Men: First Class fan-made credit sequence classy and graphic

The art of a credit sequence is probably one you haven’t thought of unless you’re watching the latest Bond film.  This fan-made opening credit sequence for the upcoming X-Men: First Class demonstrates how graphic design can set the mood for a film – in this instance by channelling the film’s 1960’s setting with bold outlines of various X-Men and the images of the era’s most prolific personalities.  Even if you have no interest in the latest X-Men film, this is quite cool. Continue reading

The Hobbit to be shot on new Red Camera, Epic

Peter Jackson holding Red's latest camera, Epic.

Not only will Peter Jackson be directing The Hobbit, he is shooting it in 3D and will be using 30 new cameras from Red, called Epic. Continue reading

Vampire Rumble: Let the Right One In vs Let Me In

As soon as a re-make of Let the Right One In was announced, film fans around the world let out a collective internet groan.  It’s not as if this sentiment is without merit considering the crop of 80’s horror classics that are in the works of being re-made (Fright Night, The Monster Squad), as well as the way foreign films are treated by the Hollywood re-make machine (Eddie Izzard’s commentary on re-makes seem apt [begins at the 1:03 mark].  So just how did Let Me In, the U.S. re-make of Let the Right One In, compare to the original?

Note: to avoid redundancies, let me clarify that Oskar and Eli are the boy and girl from Let the Right One In and Owen and Abby are the boy and girl from Let Me In.  Also, this post contains major spoilers for both films.

My wife pointed out that there is a difference between re-making a story and re-telling a story, as we’re always re-telling similar tales with different window dressings.  Michael Haneke’s Funny Games is a clear example of a re-make: it was first made in 1997  (Austria) and re-made, shot-for-shot, by Haneke in 2007 (U.S.).  Alternatively, something like John Carpenter’s The Thing is a re-telling of The Thing From Another World, which itself was based on the short story Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell.  Let Me In is an example of the latter re-telling, not a mere re-make.  Continue reading