Tag Archives: Hitler

Mercy for Monsters: Humanizing child killers and Nazis in M and Inglourious Basterds

Next to Metropolis, Fritz Lang’s M is one of his most famous films. The film’s narrative (police and criminals alike searching for a child killer), the noir lighting, its breakthroughs in sound (introduced a mere four years prior), and Peter Lorre’s infamous monologue all cement M as a classic, even nearly a century after its release.  Meanwhile, Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds is unjustly infamous for its manipulation of history. What I find most fascinating about the two films is how they treat their respective monsters (child killers and Nazis) and how their stories reflect attitudes toward societal ills.

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WWII Films You Haven’t Seen (but should)

Today marks the 69 year anniversary of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor, which kicked off the U.S.’s direct involvement in World War II (indirect involvement consisted of the Lend-Lease Act and the “cash and carry” initiative).  Almost everyone has seen Saving Private Ryan and Schindler’s List, but many probably missed out on some great World War II films released in the 2000’s.  Such as…

The Pianist (2002)

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Why you should be reading “Under the Dome”

Though this blog is titled The Filmsmith, my motto is similar to Rolling Stone: all the news that fits.  So I want to talk about Stephen King’s most recent novel, Under the Dome.

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