Tag Archives: analysis

V/H/S transcends cinematic boundaries

When I tell people I’m into watching and making horror films, some try to shrivel into themselves like a turtle – with others, you practically hear the eyes rolling in their heads.  They seem to chalk the entire genre up to consisting merely of the ghoulish or the cheap trick, whereas, I’ve found the horror genre to be fertile ground for exploring human tragedies (The Descent) or tinkering with our own mythologies (zombies, vampires, etc.).

Horror films to me aren’t scary; there remains a distance.  It’s always a guy in a rubber mask, the knife is fake, and the dark is nothing to be afraid of.  There are always cinematic artifices that maintain the boundaries between reality and fiction: a film’s score, the editing, or the spectacle of special effects.  Even as a child I don’t know if I’ve ever been truly disturbed, unsettled at my core, by a horror film

Until now. Continue reading

Why Christians Should Love “Pulp Fiction”

Much to my dismay, there are people who don’t like Quentin Tarantino’s masterpiece Pulp Fiction.   Among cinema fans you’d be harder pressed to find such sentiments, but out in the wider world such antipathy is surprisingly common.

When one of my undergrad classes watched the film, about half the class didn’t like it.  The most oft-repeated complaints: the copious amounts of swearing and violence.  I don’t know the religious affiliations of my disappointed classmates, but several people I’ve been speaking to recently, specifically Christians, have commented along similar lines.  The thing that is so mystifying to me is why they would hate a film with such strong Christian themes. Continue reading

Lady Gaga vs. M.I.A.

M.I.A. of “Paper Planes” fame isn’t a fan of Lady Gaga to say the least.  So after Gaga’s “Telephone” mini-movie/music video received so much attention, it seemed fortuitous (though I wouldn’t say planned given the time it takes to make even a short film) that M.I.A. had a mini-movie/music video of her own released a few months after Lady Gaga’s, titled “Born Free.”  For this piece, I’d like you watch the two back to back.

Here’s Lady Gaga’s “Telephone”

Continue reading