Tag Archives: The Thing

6 Films to Celebrate Winter

Today is the first official day of Winter, commonly known as the Winter Solstice.  Around this time there’s a deluge of Christmas films dulling your ears on television – but what about films with Winter as a central character?

The Thing

You can’t mention Winter and not have The Thing listed as John Carpenter’s 1982 horror film is still quintessential viewing.  A cadre of men on an Antarctic expedition are slowly annexed by an alien being.  Both the cramped quarters of the camp and the empty snowscape let you know: “You’re on your own, buddy.”  Without the option of running to the authorities, the frigid environment makes it all the more unsettling when the shapeshifting alien crops up to snack on some man flesh. Continue reading

“The Thing” prequel pushed back

The prequel for John Carpenter’s The Thing has been removed from its April 2011 premiere, with a new date set for October 14, 2011. Continue reading

Vampire Rumble: Let the Right One In vs Let Me In

As soon as a re-make of Let the Right One In was announced, film fans around the world let out a collective internet groan.  It’s not as if this sentiment is without merit considering the crop of 80′s horror classics that are in the works of being re-made (Fright Night, The Monster Squad), as well as the way foreign films are treated by the Hollywood re-make machine (Eddie Izzard’s commentary on re-makes seem apt [begins at the 1:03 mark].  So just how did Let Me In, the U.S. re-make of Let the Right One In, compare to the original?

Note: to avoid redundancies, let me clarify that Oskar and Eli are the boy and girl from Let the Right One In and Owen and Abby are the boy and girl from Let Me In.  Also, this post contains major spoilers for both films.

My wife pointed out that there is a difference between re-making a story and re-telling a story, as we’re always re-telling similar tales with different window dressings.  Michael Haneke’s Funny Games is a clear example of a re-make: it was first made in 1997  (Austria) and re-made, shot-for-shot, by Haneke in 2007 (U.S.).  Alternatively, something like John Carpenter’s The Thing is a re-telling of The Thing From Another World, which itself was based on the short story Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell.  Let Me In is an example of the latter re-telling, not a mere re-make.  Continue reading

“Devil” not that bad

The trailers for Devil proclaim “From the mind of M. Night Shyamalan” which seems to be a purposeful attempt to disavow Shyamalan’s involvement in the directing, producing, and writing side of things after previous bombs (Lady in the Water, The Happening).  The result: a company called the Night Chronicles, which produces films based on ideas from M. Night that are further developed by other individuals.  Devil, the first of the Night Chronicles, overall manages to stay afloat (though at times some bailing is required).

In the film five strangers hop on an elevator together and once it locks up between floors, tensions flare.  Detective Bowden and the building’s security watch the group devolve into bickering children through a security camera, only able to speak to them through the one way com system.

I say “devolve,” but there isn’t a transition for these people – as soon as they’re aboard the elevator they quickly reveal themselves to be stupid assholes.  Continue reading

Ginger Snaps Trilogy Roundup & The Problem of Genre Distinctions (part 4)

:read part 1, part 2, part 3:

Ginger Snaps: Complete Roundup

Though the final part of the Ginger Snaps trilogy is weak, it’s not Spider-Man 3 weak. Given the track record of horror film sequels, the entire trilogy stands up pretty well. The real strength of the series lies with the characters, specifically female lead characters. The male cast members are all supporting pieces to the story (though they play bigger parts in Ginger Snaps Back), so we get a fresh perspective as Brigitte and Ginger lead us through female territory: sisterhood, mother-daughter relationships, sex, menstruation, relationships with men, etc. Continue reading