Tag Archives: Drama

“Hereafter” surprisingly insipid

The Fountain and Sunshine are two films that tend to receive some of the most vitriolic commentary, eliciting praise or hate.  What they also have in common is their mutual exploration of what it means to die: Sunshine, “We’re all stardust” and The Fountain, “Death is the road to awe.”  Clint Eastwood isn’t having any of that shit though: in Hereafter, death leads to romantic comedy vapidity. Continue reading

Why Christians Should Love “Pulp Fiction”

Much to my dismay, there are people who don’t like Quentin Tarantino’s masterpiece Pulp Fiction.   Among cinema fans you’d be harder pressed to find such sentiments, but out in the wider world such antipathy is surprisingly common.

When one of my undergrad classes watched the film, about half the class didn’t like it.  The most oft-repeated complaints: the copious amounts of swearing and violence.  I don’t know the religious affiliations of my disappointed classmates, but several people I’ve been speaking to recently, specifically Christians, have commented along similar lines.  The thing that is so mystifying to me is why they would hate a film with such strong Christian themes. Continue reading

“It’s Kind of a Funny Story” better at bringing the drama

Right before It’s Kind of a Funny started, there was a trailer for Meet the Fockers.  It struck me that many comedies emulate the same advertising strategy as Fockers and even It’s Kind of a Funny Story.  There’s almost a predictable tempo that has evolved, with jokes delivered, pause, reply, cue laughter.  Almost as if some of these moments were written for the trailer.  The result is like seeing a haggard prostitute begging for clients long after the sex appeal has worn off.  Thankfully this labored funniness doesn’t stifle Funny Story. Continue reading

Fall(ish) Movie Preview: September

The summer film season is coming to a close, but there is plenty to look forward to. Here is your complete mega movie fall preview.

:author’s note:

I believe that trailers reveal so much information that it can spoil or at least impede the experience of watching a film for the first time. I would recommend avoiding trailers if you know you’re going to see a film. If you’re unsure of a film, however, be my guest.

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127 Hours Trailer: Danny Boyle’s Latest

The director of Trainspotting, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, and Slumdog Millionaire has a new film coming out in the fall starring James Franco, 127 Hours.  It’s based on the experience of Aron Ralston, the guy who had to amputate his own arm after becoming trapped under a boulder in Utah.

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Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan Trailer

imdb.com has the release date set for December 1, 2010.

And here I thought the film might be a bit boring from the synopsis and the trailer is more f*cked up than I could have imagined.  Guess Aronofsky won’t break into the comedy genre anytime soon considering this path of trauma that is his filmography.*

*Comments aside, love his work.

“Inception” is one of the most cerebral, kick-ass, poignant blockbusters you will ever see. Period.

The main maxim of big budget Hollywood filmmaking is “Make it Safe.”  Don’t stray from basic storytelling tropes and structures, and don’t be too smart in case you go over the audience’s head.  In the end, you want to ensure that you will get a return on your investment. Thus, the prospect of losing hundreds of millions of dollars makes a lot of mainstream films ride along in the mediocrity lane of the film freeway. Continue reading

“Monsters” post-screening Q & A (no spoilers)

Director Gareth Edwards is to the right, actors Whitney Able and Skoot McNairy to the left.

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Avoid “Putty Hill”

The tears of pretty people were the film's highlight.

This was just a bad, bad, bad movie. Continue reading

“Police, Adjective” lacks pulse

My current spate of reviews come from the Edinburgh International Film Festival, where I believe I just encountered my first dreaded “festival film” which  one writer described as:

“the submerged nine-tenths of the film production world that gets only one or two screenings in its lifetime, in a near-empty cinema in downtown Gdansk or wherever.”

I say this because watching Police, Adjective was more dull than spending three hours in hospital waiting room.*

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