Monthly Archives: October 2010

Let Me In: “A dirge for American goodness.”

Let the Right One In was the recent horror phenomenon usually known as “the Swedish vampire flick.”  A combination of excellent actors, in-depth character development, and mature execution made it a top notch vampire film that blew other blood-sucker tales out of the water.  Hence, when Hollywood announced that a re-make was in the works, the original film’s fan base made their consternation known.    Even I went in with the most cynical of sentiments (“Did they just make it into an English language film for those too illiterate to struggle with subtitles?”).  Surprisingly, I left the cinema sunk deep in stunned reflection. Continue reading

“The Social Network” is really just “the facebook movie”

After the trailer for The Social Network premiered, which included an attention-getting musical intro, anticipation for David Fincher’s The Social Network was intense. Critics were tripping over themselves to praise the film when it hit the festival circuit.

In case you haven’t heard, The Social Network is about the creation of facebook and the battle for founding credentials between founder Mark Zuckerberg–and anyone who gets in his way.  Dialogue ricochets off the walls (the first scene recalls Gilmore Girls, unfortunately), characters make impassioned proclamations, and Zuckerberg (played by Jesse Eisenberg) smirks smugly.

The underlying problem with The Social Network is that it leaves you asking, “Who gives a shit?”  The shadiness of Mark Zuckerberg and the formation  story of facebook have been well chronicled over the last year, in articles exposing intellectual property theft, hacking, and breaches of privacy.

Even if you go into The Social Network unaware of these controversies, the film fails to escape the clutches of a paint-by-numbers formula, feeling more like a Wikipedia entry than a narrative tale. Continue reading

Fall Movie Preview: October

The Social Network: October 1

This is already well known as “the facebook movie;” having David Fincher (Fight Club) on board as director makes an inane premise promising.

Continue reading